Leg or foot amputation

Definition

Leg or foot amputation is the removal of a leg, foot or toes from the body. These body parts are called extremities. Amputations are done either by surgery or they occur by accident or trauma to the body.

Alternative Names

Amputation - foot; Amputation - leg; Trans-metatarsal amputation; Below knee amputation; BK amputation; Above knee amputation; AK amputation; Trans-femoral amputation; Trans-tibial amputation

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Reasons for having an amputation of a lower limb are:

Risks

Risks of any surgery are:

Risks of this surgery are:

Before the Procedure

When your amputation is planned, you will be asked to do certain things to prepare for it. Tell your health care provider:

During the days before your surgery, you may be asked to stop taking aspirin, ibuprofen (such as Advil or Motrin), warfarin (Coumadin), and any other medicines that make it hard for your blood to clot.

Ask your provider which medicines you should still take on the day of your surgery. If you smoke, stop.

If you have diabetes, follow your diet and take your medicines as usual until the day of surgery.

On the day of the surgery, you will likely be asked not to drink or eat anything for 8 to 12 hours before your surgery.

Take any medicines you have been told to take with a small sip of water. If you have diabetes, follow the directions your provider gave you.

Prepare your home before surgery:

After the Procedure

The end of your leg (residual limb) will have a dressing and bandage that will remain on for 3 or more days. You may have pain for the first few days. You will be able to take pain medicine as you need them.

You may have a tube that drains fluid from the wound. This will be taken out after a few days.

Before leaving the hospital, you will begin learning how to:

Fitting for prosthesis, a manmade part to replace your limb, may occur when your wound is mostly healed and the surrounding area is no longer tender to the touch.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Your recovery and ability to function after the amputation depend on many things. Some of these are the reason for the amputation, whether you have diabetes or poor blood flow, and your age. Most people can still be active following amputation.You may feel sad or depressed about the surgery. It is important that you talk with your surgeon or doctor about your feelings.

References

Bastas G. Lower limb amputations. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 120.

Grimm PD, Potter BK. Amputation surgeries for the lower limb. In: Chui KK, Jorge M, Yen S-C, Lusardi MM, eds. Orthotics and Prosthetics in Rehabilitation. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 19.

Rios AL, Eidt JF. Lower extremity amputations: operative techniques and results. In: Sidawy AN, Perler BA, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 112.

Toy PC. General principles of amputations. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 14th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 14.


Review Date: 11/12/2020
Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
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